Tags


Latest Posts


Latest Comments


Authors

Database as a Service : Learning from Oracle's philosophy

stefan-haase.jpg

Posted by |

With apologies to classical scholars everywhere, these days an oracle is invariably regarded as someone who is pretty good at predicting the future. Well, IT giant Oracle would certainly seem to be living up to its name judging by the on-going success of its engineered systems approach.

It was back in 2008 when the industry first got sight of a strategy predicated on a unique fusion of hardware and software: building integrated and optimised systems from scratch, an ultra computing stack to deliver maximum performance and compelling Total Cost of Ownership. In an increasingly data-fuelled world, the view was that one couldn’t – or perhaps shouldn’t - simply rely on more and more generic machines to carry the load; hence this epic rethinking and reworking. A quick Google search reveals plenty of customers around the world queuing up to share their impressive metrics and prove Oracle’s point.

Some commentators use the tag ‘modern-day mainframe’ when discussing Oracle’s engineered system suite, and while that may be underselling this game-changing innovation somewhat, it does remind us that at the end of the day, it is still tin. Super intelligent tin, I grant you, but tin that always sits at the core of an IT project.

And with IT projects come those default challenges: Capex, operational costs, provisioning cycles, resourcing, vendor relationships etc. How good would it be then if we could marry the advantages of engineered systems to the proven benefits of an as-a-Service delivery model?

So Redcentric has taken a leaf out of the Oracle book. Oracle president Mark Hurd once described the engineered systems philosophy as ‘taking best of breed parts and vertically integrating them. We design the technology explicitly for the stack. We fine-tune it. We optimise it across all of those layers so that we can deliver better performance, better reliability, better security, more manageability...”

Why shouldn’t we do the same? Take our best of breed parts: our network, data centres, Oracle specialists, 24/7 support, accredited working. Bring them together specifically to offer a high grade Database-as-a-Service (DBaaS) solution. Tune them up. Work with clients to ensure the solution remains optimised, and an exact match for their requirements at all times. Deliver to those clients better performance, better reliability, better security, more manageability… at an affordable, transparent price point, further shortening the time to value.

I’m going to predict that this will be quite an attractive proposition.

Comments

 

Post a comment

Comment submitted! Comments needs approval before being displayed.